Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ

Does stress increases the chance of developing further BCCs?

No hard and fast rule. In some people they do slow down with age, in others there is little difference.

Do Basal Cell Carcinomas ever stop in Gorlin Syndrome?

No hard and fast rule. In some people they do slow down with age, in others there is little difference.

 

 

 

What is Moh's Surgery?

The procedure is a form of surgical excision that has been modified with mapping the margins of the tissue specimen to determine whether tumour remains. This technique spares normal tissue because of the microscopic control involved. The pain, post-operative result, follow up care and healing are similar as with standard surgical excisions. The overall chance of a cure with Moh's surgery is 99%.

 

 

Is radiotherapy treatment recommended for Gorlin Syndrome?

In some patients with Gorlin Syndrome radiotherapy may lead to rapid development of new basal cell carcinomas and therefore should be used under special / exceptional circumstances.

 

 

I'm worried my children may inherit Gorlin Syndrome. What should I do?

There is a 50:50 chance of children inheriting Gorlin Syndrome. It is suggested that an appointment is obtained with a Geneticist who will be in a position to confirm the condition in family members. The family GP can arrange the appointment.

I would like children but I have Gorlin Syndrome. What should I do?

There is a 50% risk that a child will inherit the condition. It is important to point out that you do have choices.  Speak to your Doctor or Geneticist, they will be in a position to offer information and advice about the condition, as well as offering guidance on pregnancy and child birth.

Does the size of the head mean problems during childbirth?

In pregnancy and childbirth 72% - 80% of women needed forceps or caesarean section during childbirth.

How often should screening be done for jaw cysts?

Normally, once annually unless advised otherwise by the oral consultant involved.

 

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 Originally produced by Professor P. A. Farndon, Clinical Geneticist, Jim Costello (deceased) and Margaret Costello.  We are reliant on a team of medical advisors for the clinical content of the website. We are grateful for their continuing support. 
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